Home|Search|Identify|Taxonomic tree|Quiz|About this site|Feedback
Developed by ETI BioInformatics
Characteristics, distribution and ecology
Taxonomische classification
Synonyms and common names
Literature references
Images, audio and video
Links to other Web sites

(Fabricius, 1780)

Description:
Body robust in form, partly spinous, with the lateral processes more or less crowded together, but less thickset than in Pseudopallene circularis ; dorsal side of the body segments 3 and 4 smooth, without spiniform projections. Cephalon somewhat longer than the three succeeding segments together, with a distinct, although short, neck; frontal part swollen and armed above at the anterior tip, with short spines. Abdomen lifted upwards, somewhat shorter than in Pseudopallene circularis .
Ocular tubercle exceedingly low, rounded. Proboscis pointed strongly downwards, conic, point mamilliform exerted, oral orifice surrounded by a dense wreath of delicate bristles. Chelifores in full-grown specimens very large; scape cylindrical with several spines above; hand longer than the scape, directed downwards, expanding gradually towards the tip; fingers very short, directed greatly inwards, both with a nodular projection on the inner edge and with an obtusely rounded point. Palps absent.
Ovigerous legs present in both sexes; with ten segments, in male longer than the body, the four outer segments furnished with a regular series of serrate spines.
Ambulatory legs much elongated, almost four times as long as the body and armed with numerous, comparatively small and smooth spines, each bearing a bristle at the point; propodus relatively slender, with four strong spines on the posterior part of the inner edge; terminal claw shorter than the propodus, falciform curvate.
Body a more or less vivid yellow, in aged species changing into yellowish-brown. Length of the body up to 4.5 mm; the extent between the points of the ambulatory legs reaching 39 mm.

Habitat:
A shallow-water species.

Distribution:
A northern species, Norway, Greenland and the Murman coast.

Pseudopallene spinipes